Non-state week 2014: A look at legislation affecting the non-state courts of the United States

Since its establishment in 2006 as a set of spreadsheets, Gavel to Gavel maintained itself as “A review of state legislation affecting the courts.” However, this has admitted and regrettably given short shrift to the other parts of the United States that are not states:

  1. Territory of American Samoa
  2. Territory of Guam
  3. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  4. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
  5. United States Virgin Islands
  6. District of Columbia

In 2011 Gavel to Gavel began a semi-regular practice of focusing a week on these specific non-states and that practice continues for a week starting today.

Non-state week 2012: A look at legislation affecting the non-state courts of the United States

Since its establishment in 2006 as a set of spreadsheets, Gavel to Gavel maintained itself as “A review of state legislation affecting the courts.” However, this has admitted and regrettably given short shrift to the other parts of the United States that are not states:

  1. Territory of American Samoa
  2. Territory of Guam
  3. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  4. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
  5. United States Virgin Islands
  6. District of Columbia

In 2011 Gavel to Gavel began an annual practice of focusing a week on these specific non-states and that practice continues for a week starting today.

D.C. bill would remove power of President to name judges and require they reside in the District

Much of the District of Columbia’s power and authority over its courts derives from laws passed by Congress, as reflected in their judicial selection process. Under existing law, the President appoints judges from a list of names submitted by a judicial nomination commission, subject to Senate confirmation (see D.C. Code 1-204.31 and 1-204.33)

B19-0033, however, would remove the power of the power of the President to name judges and the Senate to confirm. The bill amends the District Charter to provide the Districts’ judges are to be selected by the Mayor with the consent of the Council. It further removes the power of the judicial nominating commission to name the chief judges of the Superior Court and Court of Appeals and gives it to the judges of the respective courts. It further removes the power of the President and chief judge of the U.S. District Court for D.C. to name members of the judicial nominating commission. Finally, it requires all judges be residence of the District and have resided in the District at least 5 years (currently, under D.C. Code 11-1501 they may reside in Montgomery and Prince George’s Counties in Maryland, Arlington and Fairfax Counties “and any cities within the outer boundaries thereof and the city of Alexandria in Virginia.”)

B19-0033 is currently pending in the Council’s Judiciary Committee.

Another D.C. bill of note is B19-0008, which creates a Central Collection Unit within the Office of the City Administrator to collect all debts owed the District, including court courts. That bill is pending in the Government Operations and the Environment Committee.

Non-state week 2011: A look at legislation affecting the non-state courts of the United States

Since its establishment in 2006 as a set of spreadsheets, Gavel to Gavel maintained itself as “A review of state legislation affecting the courts.” However, this has admitted and regrettably given short shrift to the other parts of the United States that are not states:

  1. Territory of American Samoa
  2. Territory of Guam
  3. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
  4. Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
  5. United States Virgin Islands
  6. District of Columbia

This week will be dedicated to rectifying that oversight, starting today with a look at the Chief Justice of Guam’s state of the judiciary and his proposal to put a new form of judicial funding in the territory’s “Organic Act” (effectively, the constitution for the territory).