Louisiana becomes 6th state to consider legislation in 2012 to combat filing false liens on judges

I mentioned only a few weeks ago that 5 states (Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania) were considering legislation to address the practice of filing false liens or similar documents on the property of judges and/or court staff. Louisiana’s legislature, which is scheduled to come into session this week, now becomes the 6th state to confront the issue this year.

HB 616 creates the specific crime of  filing a false lien against a court or law enforcement officer. “Court officer” is defined to include

  • any active or retired justice of the peace, any active or retired judge of a city, parish, state, or federal court located in Louisiana
  • any district attorney, assistant district attorney, or investigator within the office of a district attorney
  • any city prosecutor, assistant city prosecutor, or investigator within the office of a city prosecutor
  • the attorney general and any assistant attorney general or investigator within the office of the attorney general

Those who did file a false lien would be subject to a fine ranging from $500 to the amount of the value of the false lien, plus up to two years imprisonment.

HB 616 is currently assigned to the House Administration of Criminal Justice Committee.

3 thoughts on “Louisiana becomes 6th state to consider legislation in 2012 to combat filing false liens on judges”

  1. Thanks Carol. I didn’t include the Florida bill because it wasn’t specific to judges and/or court employees, while the others specified them by title.

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