Maine bill would create 13 member “Commission To Study Priorities and Timing of Judicial Proceedings in State Courts” with only 2 members of judiciary

March 11th, 2011 by Bill Raftery Leave a reply »

What are the priority cases for courts? What should they be? In a time of dwindling budgets, every court has been confronted with these questions. Now, the Maine legislature is considering formally getting involved, too.

SB 297 creates a Commission To Study Priorities and Timing of Judicial Proceedings in State Courts. The sole duty of the commission is to “study the priority and timing of judicial proceedings in state courts including, but not limited to, judicial proceedings that require priority treatment pursuant to statute.”

The 13 member commission would have only 2 members of the judiciary (appointed by the state’s chief justice). The rest would be 2 Senators, 4 Representatives, and 1 appointee each for the Attorney General, Maine State Bar Association, Maine Prosecutors Association, Maine Trial Lawyers Association and the Pine Tree Legal Assistance.

If approved, SB 297 gives the Commission until December 7, 2011 to report and authorizes the legislature’s Joint Standing Committee on Judiciary to introduce a bill based on their findings for the 2012 session.

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