VA: Another try at increasing the mandatory retirement age for judges

December 24th, 2010 by Bill Raftery Leave a reply »

For the fifth year in a row, Virginia is considering increasing the retirement age for its judges above its current 70.

The effort began in 2007 with SB 997, a bill that would have increased the age from 70 to 75. Its author submitted the bill “because many judges aren’t ready to retire by age 70.” A proposed committee amendment to remove the limit altogether failed because as the Senator in opposition put it “I know some judges who are so committed to practice they’d never retire.” The full Senate passed it 38-0, but the House failed to take it up.

In 2008, at least three bills (HB 783, SB 19, SB 34) made their way through various committees. Much of the focus was on SB 19, although passed by both chambers it was so heavily amended in each version they could not be reconciled before adjournment. 2009 proved no better: despite a unanimous 2007 Senate two years prior, an increase to 75 (SB 856) was rejected by the 2009 Senate 18-22; the House version (HB 1818) never even made it out of committee.

2010 marked a breakthrough year: SB 206 (increase to 73) made it through the Senate and the House Courts of Justice Committee, but died when referred to House Appropriations.

HB 1497 is picking up where SB 206 left off, with 73 the apparent target age.

2 comments

  1. PATRICIA says:

    CREO QUE POR LO MENOS DEBERÍA SER A LOS 75 COMO LÍMITE, PARA QUE SI LA PERSONA ASÍ LO QUIERE SIGA TRABAJANDO, EN LA MAGISTRATURA LA EXPERIENCIA ES FUNDAMENTAL, ESO QUE NO ESTÁ ESCRITO EN NINGÚN LIBRO Y QUE NO SE PUEDE ADQUIRIR EN UNA MAESTRÍA O EN UN DOCTORADO.